Welcome to Life takes Guts!

Hello and welcome to Life takes Guts! My name is Sam Wegerbauer and I am a senior attending the University of Minnesota to study elementary education. I also cheer competitively at the U and have done so for the past 3 years. Being a full time student and athlete as well as working takes up a lot of my time but I’m hoping that this blog will be something I can go to when I need a break. I’m here to share my story and experiences with Crohn’s disease in hopes of helping other “Crohnies” who have the disease. I hope to explain my experiences in a way that allows people who don’t have the disease to know what it all entails and what their friends or family who have the disease might be going through. You can use the sidebar to go to my blog feed and see my posts!

Before getting too into this blog, I wanted to state that due to the uniqueness of this disease, no two people’s Crohn’s disease will look the same and my experiences may not be the same as others.

Crohn’s disease is a chronic inflammatory disease of the intestines and is also considered to be an autoimmune disorder. Many complications can occur due to having inflammation in the intestines such as fistulas, ulcers, perforations, bowel obstructions, anal fissures, malnutrition, an increased risk for certain cancers, especially colon cancer, side effects from medications, and other health problems like anemia, osteoporosis, arthritis, skin disorders, etc. While Crohn’s is centrally located in your intestines, it can affect other parts of your body like your joints, eyes, and gums.

Some symptoms of Crohn’s include:

-Diarrhea

-Fever

-Fatigue

-Nausea

-Vomiting

-Abdominal Pain and Cramps

-Blood in stools

-Reduced appetite and weight loss

-Delayed growth or sexual development in children

-Inflammation of skin, eyes, or joints

…And even more that I won’t list out here.

Doctors do not know the cause of this disease but suspect that it might be caused partly by heredity, partly by your environment, and partly by an immune system malfunction. There is no cure for this disease but there are ways to manage it and get into remission which is the ultimate goal of treatment.

These are the basic facts of Crohn’s disease and in my posts, I hope to elaborate more into how these symptoms and complications can affect people’s daily lives! Feel free to contact me with any questions or comments and I would be happy to answer them!